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Lettuce, Greens,  Artisan Carrots, Cabbage, Zucchini, Broccoli and More!

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Whos-Your-Farmer

Who’s Your Farmer?  The nicest thing is to get to know your farmer, for real.  Do you know who your farmer is?  Have you visited the farm?  I ask that but, although I do know my farmer, I haven’t had the time yet to go to the farm.  It’s on my to-do list though.  I’ll take a field trip (ha) and let you know how I make out.

In the meantime, check out the New Smyrna Beach Farmers Market near where I live.

Whole-Fresh-Clean-NSB-Farmers-Market

I love my Saturday mornings at the Farmers Market.   It’s ‘me’ time!

This Farmers Market is about a 20 minute drive from my house.  I guess it’s kind of a social thing too, seeing all my friends and neighbors, crafters and farmers, all in one location.  Before I leave the house, I pack an empty cooler with ice to keep my purchases cold in the car and this way if I have other errands to run while I’m out, I don’t worry about wilted veggies or spoilage.  I also bring a big straw bag and few cloth bags with me so I don’t use any plastic bags the vendors have (yes, I’ve gone green) although they do have them for new-comers.

The cooler is especially helpful when I buy eggs from the Alpaca Farmer, Chantilly Ridge Alpacas.  They bring their pasture raised chicken and duck eggs direct from the farm, and handmade alpaca fur products to the market.  I really like these eggs.  This farmer lets the chickens roam the fields with the Alpaca’s so they eat natural things like bugs and they scratch in the dirt, as they should, instead of being force-fed or in cages.  These are the best eggs on the planet.  They are ‘pastured,’ meaning raised in a pasture, not to be confused with pasteurized or processed.

I like to mosey-around and stop in at most all the booths!

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Simple-Fresh-Cooking-School-ed-nora

I’ve made friends with Ed and Nora from Simple & Fresh Cooking School.  Check out their website or stop by their booth at the New Smyrna Beach Farmers Market and sign up for one of their classes.  Although they are not gluten free, I’ve attended two of their cooking classes to date and had a blast each time.  I highly recommend them.  They are fun and yes, you get to eat what you learn to cook!  Each class I’ve learned something new.

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Simple-Fresh-Cooking-School

Although I do buy from other Farmers, I do have my favorite Farmer!

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Tomazin-Farms

“Tomazin Farms – Home of the Barefoot Farmer – feeding us since 1937.”  This is the jack-pot!  Red Leaf Lettuce, Romaine and Boston, Artisan Beets that are gold, purple and red, Turnips, Daikons, Red Radishes, Green Cabbage, Kale, Dandelions, Red Swiss Chard and Broccoli and (drum roll) my favorite Broccoli Raube, just to name some of what they offer for sale.  I can’t get enough of the stuff!

The produce at this farm is not organic but it’s local, fresh produce.  It makes all the difference in the world.  Buy anything from this farmer and it will convince you that buying locally grown just tastes better.  I buy the majority of my produce from this farmer.  They may not realize it but they are secretly part of my own network of health care professionals! 

After I make the rounds, I spend time checking out new vendor booths and get my bounty, I run other errands and then head home to spend some time at the sink and prep for the upcoming week. This is a key step in being prepared and having an easy week of cooking and eating. If you have everything washed, cut up, spun dry and bagged, it takes no time when you get home from work to throw together a quick meal.

Here’s what I do:

First thing, I take the eggs and put them in the refrigerator.  Then, I fill up the larger side of my 60-40 sink with cold water and add in 1 cup of white vinegar.  I use whatever brand is on sale.  One by one, I place each vegetable in the vinegar water bath.  For the greens, I let them soak around for 10 minutes or so to remove any dirt from the field.  Remember, these aren’t really washed or processed before or after picking like the shining vegetables you buy in the store.  These are directly from the farmer’s field.  So, I slosh them around in the white vinegar solution to remove any dirt.  Then, I rinse each leaf, each piece, under cold running water as an additional step, although that’s not really necessary.  Remember, there’s no wax or chemicals put on this food to preserve it and make it look shiny.  Think of what a cucumber looks like in the supermarket.  How’d it get that shiny?  Wax or other additives, that’s how.  Then, look at these organic ones in the photo below!

Speaking of cucumbers…

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Organic-Cucumbers

I like to leave the dark green skins on and not peel them or leave half of the peels on so they look like stripes.  If you wash them properly in white vinegar as I mentioned above, you can eat the skin and it’s good for you.  The ones in the Produce Department of your local store probably  have a wax protective coating on them that you may not be able to wash off and you certainly don’t want to eat.  If store bought, I would peel them.  Ask your Supermarket if there is a coating on the cucumbers just to be sure.  If not, just wash and eat them unpeeled.  I think they make for a nicer presentation with the peels or stripes.

So, after I wash all the vegetables, I lay them out on a kitchen towel to dry. I then start cutting and chopping and spinning them dry in my salad spinner. Using a salad spinner to remove the excess water from the vegetables, makes them last longer.

 I spin the water out and bag them up for use during the week. Another tip is if you place a paper towel in the bag, it helps absorb any leftover water which helps them last longer too. So, let’s not let this point go unnoticed. I’ve said this before so I’m not pulling any punches. This cleaning, cutting, chopping and bagging step takes additional time out of your weekend. But, it’s not just necessary or a nice thing to do, it’s a key critical piece to be prepped for the week. Take the time to do so. Your well-being, your nourishment, to eat fresh vegetables and fruit instead of processed and packaged food is really an important part of you being successful with this lifestyle. Just spend less time in front of the TV and start doing it! Make the choice to feed you and your family nourishing food. It’s as simple as that.

Check out the Recipes section so you can see what I prepare, cook and eat from my bounty that I purchase every week.

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Lettuce, Greens,  Artisan Carrots, Cabbage, Zucchini, Broccoli and More!

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Whos-Your-Farmer

Who’s Your Farmer?  The nicest thing is to get to know your farmer, for real.  Do you know who your farmer is?  Have you visited the farm?  I ask that but, although I do know my farmer, I haven’t had the time yet to go to the farm.  It’s on my to-do list though.  I’ll take a field trip (ha) and let you know how I make out.

In the meantime, check out the New Smyrna Beach Farmers Market near where I live.

Whole-Fresh-Clean-NSB-Farmers-Market

I love my Saturday mornings at the Farmers Market.   It’s ‘me’ time!

This Farmers Market is about a 20 minute drive from my house.  I guess it’s kind of a social thing too, seeing all my friends and neighbors, crafters and farmers, all in one location.  Before I leave the house, I pack an empty cooler with ice to keep my purchases cold in the car and this way if I have other errands to run while I’m out, I don’t worry about wilted veggies or spoilage.  I also bring a big straw bag and few cloth bags with me so I don’t use any plastic bags the vendors have (yes, I’ve gone green) although they do have them for new-comers.

The cooler is especially helpful when I buy eggs from the Alpaca Farmer, Chantilly Ridge Alpacas.  They bring their pasture raised chicken and duck eggs direct from the farm, and handmade alpaca fur products to the market.  I really like these eggs.  This farmer lets the chickens roam the fields with the Alpaca’s so they eat natural things like bugs and they scratch in the dirt, as they should, instead of being force-fed or in cages.  These are the best eggs on the planet.  They are ‘pastured,’ meaning raised in a pasture, not to be confused with pasteurized or processed.

I like to mosey-around and stop in at most all the booths!

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Simple-Fresh-Cooking-School-ed-nora

I’ve made friends with Ed and Nora from Simple & Fresh Cooking School.  Check out their website or stop by their booth at the New Smyrna Beach Farmers Market and sign up for one of their classes.  Although they are not gluten free, I’ve attended two of their cooking classes to date and had a blast each time.  I highly recommend them.  They are fun and yes, you get to eat what you learn to cook!  Each class I’ve learned something new.

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Simple-Fresh-Cooking-School

Although I do buy from other Farmers, I do have my favorite Farmer!

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Tomazin-Farms

“Tomazin Farms – Home of the Barefoot Farmer – feeding us since 1937.”  This is the jack-pot!  Red Leaf Lettuce, Romaine and Boston, Artisan Beets that are gold, purple and red, Turnips, Daikons, Red Radishes, Green Cabbage, Kale, Dandelions, Red Swiss Chard and Broccoli and (drum roll) my favorite Broccoli Raube, just to name some of what they offer for sale.  I can’t get enough of the stuff!

The produce at this farm is not organic but it’s local, fresh produce.  It makes all the difference in the world.  Buy anything from this farmer and it will convince you that buying locally grown just tastes better.  I buy the majority of my produce from this farmer.  They may not realize it but they are secretly part of my own network of health care professionals! 

After I make the rounds, I spend time checking out new vendor booths and get my bounty, I run other errands and then head home to spend some time at the sink and prep for the upcoming week. This is a key step in being prepared and having an easy week of cooking and eating. If you have everything washed, cut up, spun dry and bagged, it takes no time when you get home from work to throw together a quick meal.

Here’s what I do:

First thing, I take the eggs and put them in the refrigerator.  Then, I fill up the larger side of my 60-40 sink with cold water and add in 1 cup of white vinegar.  I use whatever brand is on sale.  One by one, I place each vegetable in the vinegar water bath.  For the greens, I let them soak around for 10 minutes or so to remove any dirt from the field.  Remember, these aren’t really washed or processed before or after picking like the shining vegetables you buy in the store.  These are directly from the farmer’s field.  So, I slosh them around in the white vinegar solution to remove any dirt.  Then, I rinse each leaf, each piece, under cold running water as an additional step, although that’s not really necessary.  Remember, there’s no wax or chemicals put on this food to preserve it and make it look shiny.  Think of what a cucumber looks like in the supermarket.  How’d it get that shiny?  Wax or other additives, that’s how.  Then, look at these organic ones in the photo below!

Speaking of cucumbers…

Whole-Fresh-Clean-Organic-Cucumbers

I like to leave the dark green skins on and not peel them or leave half of the peels on so they look like stripes.  If you wash them properly in white vinegar as I mentioned above, you can eat the skin and it’s good for you.  The ones in the Produce Department of your local store probably  have a wax protective coating on them that you may not be able to wash off and you certainly don’t want to eat.  If store bought, I would peel them.  Ask your Supermarket if there is a coating on the cucumbers just to be sure.  If not, just wash and eat them unpeeled.  I think they make for a nicer presentation with the peels or stripes.

So, after I wash all the vegetables, I lay them out on a kitchen towel to dry. I then start cutting and chopping and spinning them dry in my salad spinner. Using a salad spinner to remove the excess water from the vegetables, makes them last longer.

 I spin the water out and bag them up for use during the week. Another tip is if you place a paper towel in the bag, it helps absorb any leftover water which helps them last longer too. So, let’s not let this point go unnoticed. I’ve said this before so I’m not pulling any punches. This cleaning, cutting, chopping and bagging step takes additional time out of your weekend. But, it’s not just necessary or a nice thing to do, it’s a key critical piece to be prepped for the week. Take the time to do so. Your well-being, your nourishment, to eat fresh vegetables and fruit instead of processed and packaged food is really an important part of you being successful with this lifestyle. Just spend less time in front of the TV and start doing it! Make the choice to feed you and your family nourishing food. It’s as simple as that.

Check out the Recipes section so you can see what I prepare, cook and eat from my bounty that I purchase every week.

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Whole Fresh Clean.com
Port Orange, FL
802-445-LEAN (5326)

 

 

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